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Posts Tagged ‘article 3’

In law, treason is the crime that covers some of the more serious acts of disloyalty to one’s sovereign or nation. A person who commits treason is known as a traitor.

These crimes and the impeachment of officers thereof are granted by the U.S. Constitution.

ARTICLE II: Section 4

The President, Vice President and all civil Officers of the United States, shall be removed from Office of Impeachment for, and Conviction of, Treason, Bribery, or other high Crimes and Misdemeanors.

ARTICLE III: Section 3

Treason against the United States, shall consist only 1) in levying War against them, or in 2) adhering to their Enemies, giving them Aid and Comfort. No Person shall be convicted of Treason unless on the Testimony of two Witnesses to the same overt Act, or on Confession in open Court.

The Congress shall have Power to declare the Punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the person attained.

Ex parte Bollman, 8 U.S. 75 (1807), was a case brought before the United States Supreme Court, which ruled that:

“there must be an actual assembling of men, for the treasonable purpose, to constitute a levying of war”.

The Constitutional definition of treason is limited to actual, direct, and concrete involvement in an attempt to forcefully overthrow the government.

That is, treason is essentially a “military” offense. For instance, no amount of anti-government speech can qualify as treason, although giving away military secrets might.

The Supreme court could justifiably condemn them for conspiring with Enemies (of the Constitution). They have also used military force against the States and the People under the guise of their unconstitutional Military Commissions Act of 2006 and other high crimes.

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